Recent Submissions

  • Emerging Fisheries – Threat or Opportunity? 

    Gibson, Mark; McKay, David; Nicholls, Jill; Paton, Mark (1999)
    Between the months of January and March, 1999, the Canterbury Univesity's inaugral course for the Certificate in Continuing Educatron, Antarctic Studies, engaged a research syndicate to investigate and report upon threats ...
  • Antarctic Tourism – Where to Now? 

    Downer, Kate; Reaney, Richard; Watson, Nigel; Wouters, Mariska (1999)
    This paper examines the fixture of tourism in the Antarctic. It raises some fundamental policy issues and aims to challenge some preconceptions of tourism' s role and impact on the continent. The test it puts to governments ...
  • Human Artefacts in Antarctica – Treasure to be Conserved or Junk to be Removed? 

    Cadenhead, Natalie; Johnston, Lindsay; Kestle, Linda; Webb, Keryn (1999)
    The question generating this report was perceived by the syndicate to be a limited question as it is couched in very black and white terms with no middle ground indicated. There was considerable debate concerning the ...
  • Antarctica – A Strategic Asset? 

    Weinstein, Phil; Boniface, Nick; Bishop, Joanne; Noble, Nicola; Bichard, Valerie (1999)
    It's 1999 and as we rapidly head towuds the new millennium the management of global issues require the pro-active participation of all members of the intemational community. Growing strains on the quality of water, soil ...
  • Antarctica: Does it differentiate bewtween the Tourist and the Scientist? 

    Carran, Paul; Chaplow, Lester; Hodder, Sarah; Stafford, Clair; Yusoff, Kathryn (2000)
    To explore the question we must first expltme the terms used to m)Se the question - Antarctica, differentiate, scientist, and tourist. WIIat do these terms represent and how should they interpreted in the context of the ...
  • Antarctica: Phantom of the Past or Canary in the Cage? 

    Pearn, Tim; Gill-Fox, Deborah; Gemmell, Michael; Hoar, Jenifer (2000)
    "A bridge to our future and a window on our past." This was a phrase used by President Clinton to describe Antarctica when he spoke at the International Antarctic Centre recently. It sums up the view that, in essence, ...
  • Humans and Antarctica: A Model for the World? 

    Falconer, Tamsin; Foster, Tui; Mackereth, Graham (2000)
    Humans and Antarctica: A model for the world? In what ways has the relationship between humans and Antarctica been exemplary. Should the example be copied? This report examines the key features Of the relationships between ...
  • Valuing Antarctic: Why, How and With What Result? 

    Creek, Alan; Elliott, Tui; Littlewood, Chandra; Pearce-Haines, Megan; Pilkington, Stephen (2001)
    In society today, economic valuation is often assumed to be the only possible way of assigning value to things as it is the principal method used by most government and corporate policy makers. It is because Of this that ...
  • Documenting the State of the Antarctic Environment 

    Andres, Ingrid; Hampson, Ellen; Tammik, Sarah; Elliott, Christine; Revfem, Calum (2001)
    This report discusses the question "Documenting the State Of the Antarctic Environment: Why, How and what can we learn and do?" This included future implications. Documenting the state Of Antarctica's environment would ...
  • From Vostok to Vostok: Antarctic Discoveries 

    Bartholomew, Mathew; Chappell, Michael; Hay, AJ; Seale, Joyce; Walsh, Penny (2001)
    Simple words which are found carved into the cross atop Observation Hill on Hut Point, Ross Island, to commemorate the final 1910 - 1913 Antarctic party of Scott, who all perished On their return journey from the South ...
  • The Elimination of IUU Fishing in the Southern Ocean 

    Lowe, Sarah; Pope, Belinda; Poirot, Ceisha; Green, Vanessa; Henderson, Scott (2002)
    At the start of the new millennium, fisheries statistics reported that around 70 % of the world's fisheries were severely overexploited (Crothers, 1998). After centuries Of fishing in local coastal waters, an eventual ...
  • Human Impact on the Antarctic Environment: Minimising the Risk to the Unique Environment of Sub-glacial Lakes 

    Newman, Jana; Henshaw, Jenny; Seo, Jessica; Hyde, Peter; Turvey, Richard (2002)
    The Representatives, Recalling Article II of the Antarctic Treaty and Recommendations VIII-13, X-7, XII-3 and XIV-3; Recognizing the knowledge of the tectonic, geochemical, climatic, glacial and biological evolution of the ...
  • Square Peg Round Hole: A Study of Non Governmental Organisations’ Participation in the Antarctic Treaty System 

    Baynes, Vicky; Martin, Debs; Dale, Mary-Camillus; Ridgen, Jenny; Turner, Sam (2002)
    Involvement of both national and international Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) in the Antarctic occurred even before there was a formal management regime for this vast region of the south. Their calls for peace and ...
  • The Bigger The Ship The Bigger The Mess: Large Ship Tourism in the Antarctic: A Recommendation 

    Bennetts, Bron; Brabyn, Lars; Easton, Jenny; Rusbatch, Katie; Salem, Victoria (2002)
    Recalling Recommendation VIII-9 that tourism is a natural development in the Antarctic and requires regulation. Reaffirming The Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty 1991 seeks to enhance the protection ...
  • Accidents in Antarctica 

    Haverkamp, Abby; Siegfried, Alina; Genevieve, Murrell; Rooney, Nadia; Salamaca, Ricardo (2003)
    The Antarctic Treaty has been in existence for over 40 years now, and the Environmental Protocol for a decade. Yet both of these documents fail to specifically address the issue of accident liability. The Treaty does ...
  • The Madrid Protocol on Environmental Protection: is it an effective tool? 

    Chin, Mark; de Passille, Bruno; de Pomereu, Jean; Sutherland, Gill; Weber, Melissa (2003)
    Adopted in 1991 and ratified in 1998 (excluding Annex V) the Madrid Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty is a living legislative framework intended to regulate human activities in the Antarctic in ...
  • Exclusive Economic Zones: Should they be allowed in Antarctic waters? 

    Lawlor, Stephanie; Rae, Andrew; Ross, Emily; Strinemann, Ingrid (2003)
    In the first half Of the twentieth Century, seven states made claims, in some instances conflicting claims, to parts of Antarctica. Political, practical and scientific factors during this time led to the 1959 Antarctic ...
  • Resources in Antarctica: With the World’s dwindling natural resources, is there a chance for exploitation in Antarctica? 

    Curtin, Rob; Hayes, Martin; Jakob, Astrid; McClatchy, Hamish; Schleich, Nanette (2004)
    Pressure on global resources increases daily as the worlds human population and its demand for energy, raw materials, food, water and health care increases almost exponentially. Naturally such growth puts pressure on ...
  • Historic Huts; Remove, Repair or Restore? 

    Evans, Sherrie-Lee; Fuchs, Peter; Grange, Elise; Grimaldi, Wray; Ward, Gareth (2004)
    The Antarctic, and in particular the Ross Sea region, contains some irreplaceable Heritage sites that include Scott and Shackleton's huts at Cape Evans and Cape Royds. The huts are visited by many people each year both ...
  • Antarctic Drivers: What Motivates New Zealand’s Involvement in the Antarctic? 

    Cook, Barrie; Fretter, Judith; Muir, Shona; Parsons, Waverly; Woudberg, Lesley (2004)
    "lhs report seeks to identify and assess the drivers motivating New /xaland's involvement in the Antarctic region. For the purpose of this report drivers are defined as 'underlying motivations or stimuli that instigate an ...

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