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  • The Little objet a of Anarchist Philosophy 

    Rousselle, Duane (University of Canterbury, 2019)
    Lacanian theory maintains that the “object” of psychoanalysis is that which one is never without. Put another way, the “object” is actually not an object at all: it is the objet petit a, which is the cause of the subject’s ...
  • Time and the Narrative of Memory in Sebald’s Austerlitz 

    Ferris, David (University of Canterbury, 2019)
    Narratives of memory written to create a time lost or recover an originary scene from which the present derives its significance have little in common with Sebald’s narrative practice. Sebald engages with how the past ...
  • Leaving the Twenty-First Century: A Conversation with McKenzie Wark 

    Holen, Tomas B.; Shammas, Victor L. (University of Canterbury, 2019)
    In this conversation, the acclaimed writer and media scholar McKenzie Wark discusses critical theory, global climate change, the future of the university, the capitalist labor process, and more. Drawing on books such as ...
  • Book Review Rethinking Axel Honneth’s The Idea of Socialism 

    Shammas, Victor L. (University of Canterbury, 2019)
    Axel Honneth’s (2017) The Idea of Socialism is a timely reflection on a puzzling state of affairs: Perhaps at no time in the past several decades have so many sensed that there is something terribly wrong with global ...
  • Introduction (What does it mean to) Think the Novel? 

    Grimshaw, Mike; Zeiher, Cindy (University of Canterbury, 2019)
    What does the novel allow us to do? Moreover, how does it allow us think? How might it promise more than mere representation by grappling with what we must contend with in life: estrangement, alienation, contradiction and ...
  • The Contemporary Disposition of the Novel 

    Armstrong, Nancy (University of Canterbury, 2019)
    Insofar as they show readers what capitalism does to their daily lives, novels have always been contemporary.1 In the last several decades, however, so many novels are pushing the so far beyond this commonsense meaning ...
  • Beckett as the Writer of Abstraction 

    Žižek, Slavoj (University of Canterbury, 2019)
    The “empty” Cartesian subject ($) is not just the agent of abstraction (tearing apart what in reality belongs together), it is itself an abstraction, i.e., it emerges as the result of the process of abstraction, of ...
  • Jewish-Christian encounters, suicide and transitory spaces in Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment and Trollope’s Nina Balatka 

    Mondry, Henrietta (University of Canterbury, 2019)
    Two nineteenth-century novelists, Dostoevsky and Trollope, in novels written in the same year 1866/67, chose liminal spaces for suicides. In Crime and Punishment Raskolnikov contemplates suicide by throwing himself off a ...
  • A World without the Novel 

    Végső, Roland (University of Canterbury, 2019)
    The primary objective of the essay is to draw the consequences of a truly consistent deployment of the utopian desire that animates Georg Lukács’s The Theory of the Novel. On the one hand, it is quite evident that for ...
  • Henry James: To Love is to Double 

    Butler, Rex (University of Canterbury, 2019)
    For serious readers of English literature, the early and mid-career novels of Henry James (Roderick Hudson, The American, The Portrait of a Lady) are not enough. The ultimate challenge is the later ones (The Wings of the ...
  • Zadie Smith’s and Judith Butler’s Novelistic Inconsistencies 

    Sayers, Philip (University of Canterbury, 2019)
    This article argues that the novel’s embrace of inconsistency over rigour and commitment is its key distinguishing feature as a form of thought. Whereas critical theory, like other academic disciplines, tends to valorise ...
  • What Is The Novel? The Fundamental Concepts of a Literary Phenomenon 

    Gorelick, Nathan (University of Canterbury, 2019)
    What do we talk about when we talk about the novel? The history of the field of inquiry which calls itself “the theory of the novel” — a field in which, curiously, the novel is less often an object of theory in its own ...
  • Michel Houellebecq’s Novel Precarities: Literature That Leads Nowhere 

    Taylor, Victor E. (University of Canterbury, 2019)
    Why should the “academic study of literature” lead anywhere . . . at all? And, why should the “academic study of literature” find or be required to find a value exclusively in a neoliberal, hyper-monetizing economy? And, ...
  • Bataille, Literature, Happiness, & Evil 

    Themi, Tim (University of Canterbury, 2019)
    This article examines Bataille’s philosophy of art apropos of his express writings on literature. The aim is to see what program Bataille can offer for an aesthetics in terms of future writings of artistic works including ...
  • GERMAN DIFFERENCE. OSTALGIE AS A FORM OF CULTURAL IDENTITY IN UNIFIED GERMANY 

    Ponzi, Mauro (University of Canterbury, 2019)
    and filmic media. Then, 10 years after the unification, spread the so-called Ostalgie, or nostalgia for the GDR without any political connotation, but with a retrospective appreciation for the few and modest advantages ...
  • This Novel Will Self-Destruct: (Un)Writing the Self in André Gide’s The Counterfeiters 

    Viselli, Antonio (University of Canterbury, 2019)
    The novel, at its very etymological core, is innovative. It creates and renews language, genre, and ideology, narratives and discourse, often breaking with, or expanding on, traditions. Such a revolution of poiesis seems ...
  • A Dance to the Death of God: The Novels of Antony Powell 

    Grimshaw, MikeM (University of Canterbury, 2019)
    English novelist Antony Powell (1905-2000) is best known for his 12-voume novel A Dance to the Music of Time (1951-1975) [hereafter Dance]. The title is in reference to Poussin’s great painting of the same name – painted ...
  • Lila 

    Mishra, Sudesh (Macmillan Brown Centre for Pacific Studies, 2018)
    Evening. Dye from prayer flags mounted on bamboo poles runs into the western sky. They have fluttered here for over a century now and it is impossible to imagine the landscape without them: the mast of bamboo, the spinnaker ...
  • The sea is rising: Visualising climate change in the Pacific islands 

    DeLoughrey, Elizabeth (Macmillan Brown Centre for Pacific Studies, 2018)
    I begin with our earth island; a concept made possible by the satellite technologies developed in the Cold War; a battle that, while largely invisible to the majority of the people of the globe, was violently propagated ...

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