Now showing items 1-20 of 187

    • Another Look At What To Do With Time-Series Cross-Section Data 

      Reed, W.R.; Chen, X.; Lin, S. (Research Papers in EconomicsUniversity of Canterbury. Department of Economics and Finance, 2005)
      Our study revisits Beck and Katz’ (1995) comparison of the Parks and PCSE estimators using time-series, cross-sectional data (TSCS). Our innovation is that we construct simulated statistical environments that are designed ...
    • Tax Burden and the Mismeasurement of State Tax Policy 

      Reed, W.R.; Rogers, C.L. (Research Papers in EconomicsUniversity of Canterbury. Economics., 2005)
      Tax Burden, defined as the ratio of total tax revenues over personal income, is frequently used to measure state tax policy. We analyze the empirical relationship between changes in Tax Burden and changes in tax policies ...
    • Robust Analytical Egalitarianism: Worst-case political economy and the socialist calculation debate 

      Crampton, E.; Farrant, A. (University of Canterbury. Economics., 2005)
      This paper began with Hume’s warning concerning political knavery. In Hume’s terms, the welfare losses attributable to one vice (or imperfection), namely, that of planner self-interest, are attenuated by that of low ...
    • Estimating the WACC in a regulatory setting: an assessment of Dr Martin Lally’s paper ‘The weighted average cost of capital for electricity lines businesses’ of 8 September 2005 

      Boyle, G.; Evans, L.; Guthrie, G. (New Zealand Institute for the Study of Competition and RegulationUniversity of Canterbury. Department of Economics and Finance, 2006)
      In September 2005, the New Zealand Commerce Commission (NZCC) released a document (The Weighted Average Cost of Capital for Electricity Lines Businesses by Dr Martin Lally, referred to as LINES hereafter) that estimates ...
    • Noise Pollution Issues 

      Scott, K.N.; Dolman, S. (University of Canterbury. School of Law., 2006)
      The categorisation of undersea noise as a source of pollution and as a potential threat to marine biodiversity began in the early 1990s in response to a coincidence of three ‘focusing events’:2 the shock testing of vessels ...
    • The Determinants of U. S. State Economic Growth: A Less Extreme Bounds Analysis 

      Reed, W.R. (University of Canterbury. Department of Economics and Finance, 2006)
      This study investigates U.S. state economic growth from 1970-1999. I innovate on previous studies by developing a new approach for addressing “model uncertainty” issues associated with estimating growth equations. My ...
    • A Monte Carlo Evaluation of the Efficiency of the PCSE Estimator 

      Reed, W.R.; Chen, X.; Lin, S. (University of Canterbury. Department of Economics and Finance, 2006)
      Panel data characterized by groupwise heteroscedasticity, cross-sectional correlation, and AR(1) serial correlation pose problems for econometric analyses. It is well known that the asymptotically efficient, FGLS estimator ...
    • Real options and transmission investment: the New Zealand grid investment test 

      Boyle, G.; Guthrie, G.; Meade, R. (University of Canterbury. Department of Economics and Finance, 2006)
      Responsibility for approving proposed transmission investment programmes in New Zealand has recently been placed in the hands of a newly-formed government regulator. In this paper, we develop an analytical framework for ...
    • Boundary Algebra: A Simple Notation for Boolean Algebra and the Truth Functors 

      Meguire, P. (University of Canterbury. Department of Economics and Finance, 2007)
      Boundary algebra [BA] is a simpler notation for Spencer-Brown’s (1969) primary algebra [pa], the Boolean algebra 2, and the truth functors. The primary arithmetic [PA] is built up from the atoms, ‘()’ and the blank page, ...
    • Risky Punishment and Reward in the Prisoner's Dilemma 

      Duersch, P.; Servatka, M. (University of Canterbury. Department of Economics and Finance, 2007)
      We conduct a prisoner’s dilemma experiment with a punishment/reward stage, where punishments and rewards are risky. This is compared with a risk free treatment. We find that subjects do not change their behavior in the ...
    • Sarbanes-Oxley and its aftermath: a review of the evidence 

      Boyle, G.; Grace-Webb, E. (University of Canterbury. Department of Economics and Finance, 2007)
      Introduced in response to several high profile US corporate collapses, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX) of 2002 has proven to be a gold mine for academic researchers: after only five years, no less than 528 studies of SOX ...
    • Separating Reputation, Social Influence, and Identification Effects in a Dictator Game 

      Servatka, M. (University of Canterbury. Department of Economics and Finance, 2007)
      This study explores the ways in which information about other individual's action affects one's own behavior in a dictator game. The experimental design discriminates behaviorally between three possible effects of recipient's ...
    • Understanding Credit Risk: A Classroom Experiment 

      Servatka, M.; Theocharides, G. (University of Canterbury. Department of Economics and Finance, 2007)
      This classroom experiment introduces students to the notion of credit risk by allowing them to trade on comparable corporate bond issues from two types of markets - investment-grade and high-yield. Investment-grade issues ...
    • Risky Punishment and Reward in the Prisoner’s Dilemma 

      Duersch, P.; Servatka, M. (University of Canterbury. Department of Economics and Finance, 2007)
      We conduct a prisoner’s dilemma experiment with a punishment/reward stage, where punishments and rewards are risky. This is compared with a risk free treatment. We find that subjects do not change their behavior in the ...
    • A Monte Carlo Evaluation of Some Common Panel Data Estimators when Serial Correlation and Cross-sectional Dependence are Both Present 

      Reed, W.R.; Haichun, Y. (University of Canterbury. Department of Economics and Finance, 2007)
      This study employs Monte Carlo experiments to evaluate the performances of a number of common panel data estimators when serial correlation and cross-sectional dependence are both present. It focuses on fixed effects models ...
    • A Monte Carlo Evaluation of some common panel data estimators when serial correlation and cross-sectional dependence are both present 

      Reed, W.R.; Ye, H. (University of Canterbury. Economics, 2007)
      This study employs Monte Carlo experiments to evaluate the performances of a number of common panel data estimators when serial correlation and cross-sectional dependence are both present. It focuses on fixed effects models ...
    • Does Generosity Generate Generosity? An Experimental Study of Reputation Effects in a Dictator Game 

      Servatka, M. (University of Canterbury. Department of Economics and Finance, 2007)
      This paper explores how information about paired subject's previous action affects one's own behavior in a dictator game. The first experiment puts dictators in two environments where they can either give money to the ...
    • China’s Energy Economy: Technical Change, Factor Demand and Interfactor/Interfuel Substitution 

      Ma, H.; Oxley, L.; Gibson, J.; Kim, B. (Department of EconomicsUniversity of Canterbury. Economics., 2008)
      With its rapid economic growth, China’s primary energy consumption has exceeded domestic energy production since 1994, leading to a substantial expansion in energy imports, particularly of oil. China’s energy demand has ...
    • Testing for Energy Market Integration in China 

      Ma, H.; Oxley, L.; Gibson, J. (Department of EconomicsUniversity of Canterbury. Economics., 2008)
      The paper investigates energy market integration in China by employing univariate, and panel-based unit root tests and Granger causality tests applied to a new, energy price data set. We identify price series that converge ...
    • Strategic Use of Trust 

      Servátka, M.; Tucker, S.; Vadovic, R. (University of ConnecticutUniversity of Canterbury. Department of Economics and Finance, 2008)
      While most of the previous literature interprets trust as an action, we adopt a view that trust is represented by a belief that the other party will return a fair share. The agent’s action is then a commitment device that ...