Now showing items 1-14 of 14

    • Are the new media radically more independent? 

      Matheson, D. (University of Canterbury. Mass Communication and Journalism., 2008)
      Donald Matheson delves into the murky world of the warblogs and concludes that they can be subject to as much political control as traditional forms of journalism
    • Blogging the New Zealand Election: The impact of new media practices on the old game 

      Hopkins, K.; Matheson, D. (University of Canterbury. School of Social and Political SciencesUniversity of Canterbury. Media and Communication and Journalism, 2005)
      While the audiences for news and current affairs on the Internet are small, there is evidence from the United States that some online media are having a disproportionate influence on public affairs through their impact on ...
    • The Chinese writer as empty signifier: a corpus-based analysis of the English-language reporting of the 2012 Nobel Prize in Literature 

      Xin, J.; Matheson, D. (University of Canterbury. School of Language, Social and Political SciencesUniversity of Canterbury. Communication DisordersUniversity of Canterbury. Media and Communications, 2015)
      This study examines the English-language reporting of the award in 2012 of the Nobel Prize in Literature to the Chinese author, Mo Yan. Through the corpus-based analysis of news reporting in four countries, the study found ...
    • Communication in a Postdisaster Community: The Struggle to Access Social Capital 

      Matheson, D.; Jones, A. (University of Canterbury. School of Language, Social and Political SciencesUniversity of Canterbury. Media and Communications, 2016)
      This article conceptualizes social capital in communicative terms to describe the social resources available to members of one suburb in Christchurch, New Zealand, as they seek to recover from a natural disaster. It notes ...
    • Critiquing the critical: A reflection on critical discourse analysis 

      Matheson, D. (University of Canterbury. School of Social and Political SciencesUniversity of Canterbury. Mass Communication and Journalism, 2008)
      This paper is a reflection upon a central tension within discourse analysis. On the one hand, the use of the word discourse signals a desire to understand social interaction as it emerges for the people engaged in that ...
    • The emerging practices of Chinese web journalism during the Beijing Olympics: A textual comparison with Western news sites 

      Xin, J.; Matheson, D. (University of Canterbury. School of Social and Political SciencesUniversity of Canterbury. Media and Communication and Journalism, 2013)
      When the Beijing Olympics opened in July 2008, it was described by commentators as the first online games. The moment of the Games therefore presents an opportunity to compare the way web-based news is being produced by ...
    • Hans-Georg Gadamer's philosophical hermeneutics and journalism research 

      Matheson, D. (University of Canterbury. School of Social and Political SciencesUniversity of Canterbury. Media and Communication and Journalism, 2009)
      The philosophical hermeneutics of German phenomenologist Hans-Georg Gadamer (1900-2002) is rarely cited in journalism studies, although it is better known in the fields of history, literary study and classical philology. ...
    • In Search of Popular Journalism in New Zealand 

      Matheson, D. (University of Canterbury. School of Language, Social and Political SciencesUniversity of Canterbury. Media and Communications, 2007)
      This paper explores the discourses of popular legitimacy deployed by New Zealand journalists. It studies in particular the ways that journalists reflect upon their relationship with “the people”, through their comments in ...
    • The Interpretative Resources of Aotearoa New Zealand Journalists Reporting on Maori 

      Matheson, D. (University of Canterbury. Mass Communication and Journalism., 2007)
      This paper explores the interpretative resources which news and features journalists in Aotearoa New Zealand draw on in making sense of their reporting on Māori people and themes. As many commentators and scholars have ...
    • Minding the gaps 

      Matheson, D. (University of Canterbury. School of Social and Political SciencesUniversity of Canterbury. Media and Communication and Journalism, 2010)
      This paper is a reflection – from the position of a journalism researcher – on one of the distinctive features of research on Aotearoa New Zealand media and communication and some of the reasons for that. Studying and ...
    • Negotiating Claims to Journalism: Webloggers' Orientation to News Genres 

      Matheson, D. (University of Canterbury. School of Social and Political SciencesUniversity of Canterbury. Media and Communication and Journalism, 2004)
      This paper explores how writers of online diaries, or weblogs, about public affairs negotiate their relationship with the genres and social position of news journalism. Although often labelled radical journalists, this ...
    • Online Journalism in the Information Age 

      Allan, S.; Matheson, D. (University of Canterbury. Media and Communication and Journalism, 2004)
      The use of information by the powerful and privileged as a means to reinforce, even exacerbate, the structures of the ‘digital divide’ is well documented. In our view, however, insufficient attention has been devoted to ...
    • Positioning in Media Dialogue: Negotiating Roles in the News Interview by Elda Weizman 

      Matheson, D. (University of Canterbury. School of Social and Political SciencesUniversity of Canterbury. Media and Communication and Journalism, 2010)
      This book is a series of analyses of how interviewers and interviewees position themselves and each other in Israeli television news interviews, all based on interviews from the early evening current affairs show, ‘Erev ...
    • Scowling at Their Notebooks: The Management of Writing within British Journalism’s Reflexive Identity 

      Matheson, D. (University of Canterbury. School of Social and Political SciencesUniversity of Canterbury. Media and Communication and Journalism, 2003)
      This article examines the understanding of newswriting within British print news journalism, and in particular the practice’s management of the role of language in the news. Its material comprises journalists’ reflections ...