Now showing items 1-20 of 37

    • Aeolian processes and landforms 

      McGowan, Hamish (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      Aeolian processes play an integral role in the evolution of our landscape through the entrainment, transportation, and deposition of fine grained sediments by the wind. They may be triggered by both natural and human-induced ...
    • Animals in the physical environment 

      Harvey, Ed (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      'New Zealand is as close as we will get to the opportunity to study life on another planet.' (Diamond 1990) Although the physical environment has been described as a habitat template for animals (Southwood 1977 ), many ...
    • Approaches to implementing a strengthened global response to the threat of climate change 

      Hayward BM; Roy J (IPCC, 2018)
      The principal rationale for this chapter is to gather and assess the best available policy relevant knowledge from the available literature, including existing options and case studies, on what is known about the methods ...
    • The biosphere and the role of vegetation 

      Holland, Peter (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      'Vegetation' signifies palatable plants to a pastoral farmer, commercially important trees to a forester, diverse textures to an artist, and valued species to a conservationist. To a geographer, the vegetation cover of ...
    • Broad background to the physical environment 

      Spronken-Smith, R.A.; Sturman, A.P. (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      The physical environment is the set of physical and biological conditions that surround human beings at the Earth's surface. This book is broadly based on a systems approach to the physical environment. A system may be ...
    • Climate variation in New Zealand and the Southwest Pacific 

      Salinger, Jim (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      Climate variation in the New Zealand and Southwest Pacific region is very much a subset of climate variation within the global climate system. The climate in any place over a particular time period is determined by ...
    • Co-opting the Global Health Agenda: The Problematic Role of Partnerships and Foundations in Defining Priorities 

      Faubion, C.T.; Paige, S.B.; Pearson, A.L. (Palgrave MacmillanUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2011)
      There is little dispute that the global health agenda is increasingly being shaped by foundations and partnerships, as the introduction to and rationale for this book make plain. In the wake of structural adjustment in the ...
    • Cosmic structure, averaging and dark energy 

      Wiltshire, D.L. (Cambridge Scientific PublishersUniversity of Canterbury. Physics and Astronomy, 2014)
      These lecture notes review the theoretical problems associated with coarse-graining the observed inhomogeneous structure of the universe at late epochs, of describing average cosmic evolution in the presence of growing ...
    • Cultivating Community Economies: Tools for building a liveable world 

      Gibson-Graham JK; Cameron J; Dombroski K; Healy S; Miller E (2017)
    • Denudation, weathering, and slope development 

      Fitzsimons, Sean (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      The rock formation and deformation processes described in Chapters 2 and 3 can be described as endogenic because they originate from within the Earth. When rocks are exposed at the Earth's surface by uplift and erosion, ...
    • Evaporation and the water balance 

      Kelliher, Francis M.; Jackson, R. (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      In New Zealand most water reaches the land surface as rain. Some rain evaporates after being caught on the surfaces of plants (a process called interception), but the rest reaches the ground and usually soaks into the ...
    • The geomorphological role of rivers 

      Heerdegen, Richard (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      Rivers are rather like the high-voltage transmission lines that cross the landscape. Just as power lines transport the energy produced at power stations, which is then transformed into work by its use, so too are rivers ...
    • Glaciers and the environment 

      Lawson, W.; Fitzsimons, S. (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      Glaciers are significant in the global env ironmental system for a variety of reasons. Most significant is the fact that approximately 80% of the globe's fresh water is locked up in glacier ice, a volume of water equivalent ...
    • Global energy and climate processes 

      Fitzharris, Blair (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      The global climate system is driven by energy, almost all of which comes from the Sun. In this chapter, variations in the Sun-Earth relationship, which create spatial and temporal variations in the receipt of solar ...
    • Grammatical Analysis of Language Disability - 2nd Edition 

      Crystal, David; Fletcher, Paul; Garman, Michael (Cole and Whurr, 1989)
      This series is the first to approach the problem of language disability as a single field. It attempts to bring together areas of study which have traditionally been treated under separate headings, and to focus on the ...
    • Grow 2.2 Manual 

      Crittenden, D.L.; Collins, M.A.; Jordan, M.J.T.; Thompson, K.C.; Bettens, R.P.A.; Duncan, A. (FreewareUniversity of Canterbury. Chemistry, 2005)
      Grow 2.2 is based upon the original Grow 1.0 suite of programs developed by Meredith Jordan, Keiran Thompson, Ryan Bettens, Alexander Duncan and Michael Collins. A number of significant changes have been made to the ...
    • Human impacts on the physical environment 

      Single, M. (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      Human activities affect the operation of physical environment processes, and the results rebound on the human world. The human factor is an important consideration in assessing climate, landform, and ecosystem changes. ...
    • Interactions within the physical environment 

      Holland, Peter (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      Formal research in physical geography began with programmes of detailed observation in small areas. Over time the results were collated and generalised to ever-larger scales, culminating in such seminal work as Davis's ...
    • Karst and solution processes 

      Williams, Paul (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      Karst develops on rocks where solution (or corrosion, as it is sometimes called ) is the dominant landscape-forming process, even though the full suite of other geomorphic processes occurs. All rocks dissolve in natural ...
    • Local and regional weather and climate 

      Sturman, A.P. (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      The synoptic weather systems described in Chapter 5 provide the backdrop for the local and regional variation of weather and climate that is a marked feature of the New Zealand environment. The nature of surface topography ...