Now showing items 1-20 of 38

    • Working with LARSP 

      Crystal, David (Edward Arnold, 1979)
      This series is the first to approach the problem of language disability as a single field. It attempts to bring togeth,er areas of study which have traditionally been treated under separate headings, and to focus on the ...
    • Grammatical Analysis of Language Disability - 2nd Edition 

      Crystal, David; Fletcher, Paul; Garman, Michael (Cole and Whurr, 1989)
      This series is the first to approach the problem of language disability as a single field. It attempts to bring together areas of study which have traditionally been treated under separate headings, and to focus on the ...
    • Profiling Linguistic Disability 

      Crystal, David (Singular Publishing Group, 1992)
    • Evaporation and the water balance 

      Kelliher, Francis M.; Jackson, R. (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      In New Zealand most water reaches the land surface as rain. Some rain evaporates after being caught on the surfaces of plants (a process called interception), but the rest reaches the ground and usually soaks into the ...
    • Denudation, weathering, and slope development 

      Fitzsimons, Sean (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      The rock formation and deformation processes described in Chapters 2 and 3 can be described as endogenic because they originate from within the Earth. When rocks are exposed at the Earth's surface by uplift and erosion, ...
    • Karst and solution processes 

      Williams, Paul (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      Karst develops on rocks where solution (or corrosion, as it is sometimes called ) is the dominant landscape-forming process, even though the full suite of other geomorphic processes occurs. All rocks dissolve in natural ...
    • Climate variation in New Zealand and the Southwest Pacific 

      Salinger, Jim (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      Climate variation in the New Zealand and Southwest Pacific region is very much a subset of climate variation within the global climate system. The climate in any place over a particular time period is determined by ...
    • Animals in the physical environment 

      Harvey, Ed (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      'New Zealand is as close as we will get to the opportunity to study life on another planet.' (Diamond 1990) Although the physical environment has been described as a habitat template for animals (Southwood 1977 ), many ...
    • Synoptic controls on the weather 

      Sturman, A.P. (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      Atmospheric processes operate over a range of scales from global to micro. The synoptic scale refers to those processes that operate over a spatial scale of hundreds to a few thousand kilometres, with a time scale ranging ...
    • Glaciers and the environment 

      Lawson, W.; Fitzsimons, S. (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      Glaciers are significant in the global env ironmental system for a variety of reasons. Most significant is the fact that approximately 80% of the globe's fresh water is locked up in glacier ice, a volume of water equivalent ...
    • Human impacts on the physical environment 

      Single, M. (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      Human activities affect the operation of physical environment processes, and the results rebound on the human world. The human factor is an important consideration in assessing climate, landform, and ecosystem changes. ...
    • Aeolian processes and landforms 

      McGowan, Hamish (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      Aeolian processes play an integral role in the evolution of our landscape through the entrainment, transportation, and deposition of fine grained sediments by the wind. They may be triggered by both natural and human-induced ...
    • Marine processes and coastal landforms 

      Kirk, R. (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      As most (86%) of the New Zealand population is urban and no part of the country is more than 130 km from the sea, most New Zealanders live, work, and play in the coastal zone and its resources are exploited in manifold ...
    • Broad background to the physical environment 

      Spronken-Smith, R.A.; Sturman, A.P. (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      The physical environment is the set of physical and biological conditions that surround human beings at the Earth's surface. This book is broadly based on a systems approach to the physical environment. A system may be ...
    • Natural Hazards 

      Owens, I. (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      Major contributions to the study of natural hazards have been made by human geographers, or at least by geographers who note that consideration of human vulnerability to extreme events is the major factor influencing ...
    • Precipitation processes and water storage 

      Sturman, A.P.; Owens, I.F.; Fitzharris, B.B. (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      This chapter is the first of four on hydrological aspects of the physical environment. An introduction is provided to the concept of the hydrological system, including the transfer of water between the main storage ...
    • Local and regional weather and climate 

      Sturman, A.P. (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      The synoptic weather systems described in Chapter 5 provide the backdrop for the local and regional variation of weather and climate that is a marked feature of the New Zealand environment. The nature of surface topography ...
    • Rock Formation and Earth Building Processes 

      Pettinga, J.R. (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geological Sciences, 2001)
      Study of the physical environment preferentially focuses on the processes and phenomena occurring at the Earth's surface, where most human activity takes place. It is, however, important at the outset to describe the ...
    • The biosphere and the role of vegetation 

      Holland, Peter (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      'Vegetation' signifies palatable plants to a pastoral farmer, commercially important trees to a forester, diverse textures to an artist, and valued species to a conservationist. To a geographer, the vegetation cover of ...
    • The geomorphological role of rivers 

      Heerdegen, Richard (Oxford University PressUniversity of Canterbury. Geography, 2001)
      Rivers are rather like the high-voltage transmission lines that cross the landscape. Just as power lines transport the energy produced at power stations, which is then transformed into work by its use, so too are rivers ...