Now showing items 15994-16013 of 16269

    • What narratives emerge as Māori parents seek to revitalize Māori language with their children? 

      Martin, R.S. (University of Canterbury. School of Teacher Education, 2015)
    • What new liquefaction can teach us about old earthquakes: Evaluating the efficacy of paleoliquefaction analytics using modern analogs 

      Maurer, B.W.; Green, R.A.; Bradley, B.A.; Cubrinovski, M. (University of Canterbury. Civil and Natural Resources Engineering, 2014)
      Paleoliquefaction back-analyses can be very accurate if earthquake source location & mechanism are known. Accurate analysis is more difficult if source location is unknown, but index Ef enables more intelligent estimate ...
    • What on Earth Could Live on Mars? 

      Dobson, Wills (2014)
      This project explores the similarities and differences of climate between the Antarctic Dry Valleys and Mars. Specifically looking into possible locations where the cyanobacteria Chroococcidiopsis could survive. It goes ...
    • What prevents hybridisation in Celmisia? 

      Gosden, Jane Louise (University of Canterbury. Biological Sciences, 2012)
      Hybrids are common, being found in about 25% of all plant species, but the isolating barriers which preserve species integrity are poorly studied. I investigated this question in the large New Zealand genus Celmisia Cass. ...
    • What proportion of the small-scale owners' estate in the North Island is likely to be harvested? 

      Manley, B.; Morgenroth, J.; Visser, R.; Final year BForSc students of 2014 (University of Canterbury. School of Forestry, 2015)
      The small-scale forest estate, much of which was planted in the 1990s, will provide an increasing proportion of New Zealand’s harvest volumes over the next decade. However there are questions about the proportion of ...
    • What relationship exists between Antarctic Coastal and Abyssal Benthic Marine Fauna? 

      Lowe, Sarah (University of Canterbury, 2002)
      Polar and deep-sea faunas both exist in similar conditions of cold and pulsed nutrient input. The theories of and evidence for the origin Of both global deep-sea and Antarctic shallow ',vater faunas are considered, and ...
    • What Structural system is Best? 

      MacRae, G.A.; Chanchi, J.; Yeow, T. (University of Canterbury. Civil and Natural Resources Engineering, 2014)
      This paper discusses some tools that may assist designers to determine the building system which is “best”. The choice of building structural system may be treated as a constrained optimization problem considering uncertainty. ...
    • What supports 11 to 13 year old Pasifika students in mathematics learning in New Zealand classrooms? 

      Nicholas, K.; Fletcher, J. (University of Canterbury. School of Teacher Education, 2016)
      The steepest decline in achievement in New Zealand primary schools occurs in Years 7 and 8, with the greatest decline in the subject area of mathematics. The cohort that achieves at the lowest level in New Zealand schools ...
    • What the applicability of mathematics says about its philosophy 

      Wilson PL (Springer, 2018)
      We use mathematics to understand the world. This fact lies behind all of modern science and technology. Mathematics is the tool used by physicists, engineers, biologists, neuroscientists, chemists, astrophysicists and ...
    • What to Aim For? The Choice of an Inflation Objective When Openness Matters 

      Froyen, R.T.; Guender, A.V. (University of Canterbury. Department of Economics and Finance, 2013)
      Inflation targeting countries generally define the inflation objective in terms of the consumer price index. Studies in the academic literature, however, reach conflicting conclusions concerning which measure of inflation ...
    • What to Aim for? The Choice of an Inflation Objective when Openness Matters 

      Froyen, R.T.; Guender, A.V. (University of Canterbury. Department of Economics and Finance, 2016)
      Inflation targeting countries generally define the inflation objective in terms of the consumer price index. Studies in the academic literature, however, reach conflicting conclusions concerning which measure of inflation ...
    • What went wrong? The Importance of Better Human Factors 

      Chase, J.G.; LeCompte, A.J.; Steel, J.; Ward, L.M.; Evans, A.; Tan, C.; Lynn, A.; Shaw, G.M. (University of Canterbury. Mechanical Engineering, 2010)
      Human factors has a science to it but is actually a very experiential field comprising engineers, designers, social scientists and others. Some say that the easiest way to learn from the experience of others is via stories, ...
    • What works with youth? : an evaluation of the adventure development counselling programme. 

      Mossman, Susan Elaine (University of Canterbury. School of Educational Studies and Human Development, 2005)
      Within New Zealand and internationally the capacity to deliver effective treatment for adolescent mental health problems has been identified as a priority concern. This research sought to evaluate an established New Zealand ...
    • What's in a cost? Comparing economic and public health measures of alcohol's social costs 

      Crampton, E.; Burgess, M.; Taylor, B. (University of Canterbury. Department of Economics and Finance, 2012)
      Studies based on a cost of illness method frequently assert large social costs from a variety of risky activities, the harms from which most typically fall upon the risk-taker himself. Many of these costs are inadmissible ...
    • What's in a map? communicating natural hazard forecasts. 

      Baird, Nathanael Lloyd (University of Canterbury. Geology, 2014)
      The number of people suffering from natural disasters, and the economic impact of those disasters, continue to increase as the years go by. Better preparation and risk management strategies can help lessen the impacts of ...
    • What, how and why : reconceptualising science education. 

      Longbottom, John E (University of Canterbury. Physics and Astronomy, 2000)
      This thesis proposes a reconceptualisation of science education. Compulsory science education should be seen in the broad context of general education, and science education should share the social goal of enhancing ...
    • What’s Happening with the Ozone Hole? 

      Ridgen, Jenny (University of Canterbury, 2002)
      Discovered by Schonbein in 1839, ozone (03) is a highly reactive and toxic form of oxygen with a pungent smell. It occurs both naturally and as an atmospheric pollutant at ground level. Ozone is found in low concentrations ...
    • What’s in a name? The toponyms of Ross Island, Antarctica 

      Wood, Ann (University of Canterbury, 2003)
      The purpose of this review is to identify the place-names of Ross Island, Antarctica and then to trace them back to their origins in the Heroic and Modern ages. The purpose of this review is to identify the place-names of ...
    • What’s still wrong with psychology, anyway? Twenty slow years, three old issues, and one new methodology for improving psychological research. 

      Woods, Bradley Dean (University of Canterbury. Psychology, 2011)
      Recent retrospectives of classic psychology articles by Meehl (1978) and Wachtel (1980), concerning problems with psychology’s research paradigm, have been viewed by commentators, on the whole, as germane as when first ...
    • Whānau Coping Under the Circumstance of Multiple Job Holding 

      Pere, Huia Matariki (University of Canterbury. Sociology and Anthropology, 2007)
      This thesis explores how Māori whānau cope under the circumstance of multiple job holding in four whānau who have at least one member who is a multiple job holder. The study uses a behavioural model of family resilience ...