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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10092/6503

Title: Using Online Assessment to Replace Invigilated Assessment in Times of a Natural Disaster - Are Some Online Assessment Conditions Better than Others?
Authors: Agnew, S.
Hickson, S.M.
Keywords: Economics education
principles of Economics
online assessment
student grades
disruption to assessment
earthquake
Issue Date: 2011
Citation: Agnew, S., Hickson, S.M. (2011) Using Online Assessment to Replace Invigilated Assessment in Times of a Natural Disaster - Are Some Online Assessment Conditions Better than Others?. Department of Economics and Finance. 18pp..
Source: http://www.econ.canterbury.ac.nz/RePEc/cbt/econwp/1141.pdf
Abstract: As the result of the September 4th 2010 Canterbury earthquake and associated aftershocks on February 22nd 2011 and June 13th 2011, final examinations in the two 100 level economics papers at Canterbury University were cancelled at short notice in semester one 2011. The final examination weightings were spread over the remaining assessments to obtain a final grade for students. This paper attempts to establish how different online assessment conditions affect final grade distributions when online assessments are substituted for an invigilated final examination. Pearson correlation coefficients and Spearman rank order correlation coefficients are used to show that there is a greater correlation between online quizzes and invigilated assessments when those quizzes are only available for a restricted period of time, compared to the whole semester. We find that online quizzes are more closely correlated with invigilated assessments when the first attempt at a quiz is recorded, as opposed to the highest of two attempts. We also find that using the first attempt leads to less grade disruption when compared to a “normal” semester that includes a final examination. Finally, the actual impact on student grades when online quizzes are substituted for a final examination is discussed.
Publisher: University of Canterbury
University of Canterbury. Department of Economics and Finance
Research Fields: Field of Research::13 - Education::1302 - Curriculum and Pedagogy::130203 - Economics, Business and Management Curriculum and Pedagogy
Field of Research::13 - Education::1303 - Specialist Studies in Education::130303 - Education Assessment and Evaluation
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10092/6503
Rights URI: http://library.canterbury.ac.nz/ir/rights.shtml
Appears in Collections:Business and Law: Working Papers

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